Martin Krasnik is an investigative journalist working with political debates and discussions that take place on the TV-show, Deadline on DR2. He has written books and worked at one of the biggest newspapers in Denmark (Weekendavisen)
Graduated in Political Science and now employed at DR.

Martin recommends…

 

Cartel Land

Cartel Land

The drug war has cost around 120.000 lives, destroying entire areas of land, ruining cities, breaking families and is slowly undermining an entire state – and even so it is one of the most uncovered conflicts by far. The mexican drug cartels now control 90 percent of the drugs that enter the United States and despite nearly ten years of purposive war, the Mexican government is unable to protect the people against the cartels. This has made the Mexican doctor, Jose Mireles, take matters into his own hands in armed combat against these cartels. The American documentarist Matthew Heinman follows Dr. Mireles and his strange flock of angry, armed citizens and at the same time portrays the elements of war; from police to politicians, to drug gangsters and crystal-meth cooks. It is an enormously fascinating, well told and completely depressing story about what happens, when the state abandon the monopoly on violence and power.

Read more about the film here.

 

The Dream of Europe

The Dream of Europe

This film was first shown sometime in April, but is in many ways already outdated. The stream of refugees and migrants into Europe has created panic during the Summer among the European politicians, paralyzed EU and made defense fortifications such as the Dublin III regulation and Frontex crash and collapse. But that does not make The Dream of Europe any less relevant. The film follows two norwegian police officers, Rolf and Karoline, in their hunt for illegal immigrants, especially from Africa. “We set aside human considerations,” they say in the film – the film that actually unfolds all the political and moral dilemmas in this existential question for Europe. But most importantly it underlines that it is about people – whether on the run or searching for a better life, and what happens when the dream of Europe meets the reality of Europe.

Læs mere om filmen here.

 

Citizen Khodorkovsky

Citizen Khodorkovsky

You could also call this film “Crime and Punishment in Putinland”. It follows the trial against Mikhail Khodorkovsky; once the richest man in Russia, an oligarch and oil billionaire, who committed the crime of criticizing Vladimir Putin. This gave him a trip to a Siberian work camp. The film is told through an extensive correspondence of letters between Mikhail Khodorkovsky and the director of the film, Eric Bergkraut and it gives a good portrait of the Russian plutocrat and dissident. But the most interesting for me is the glimpse into the Russian court of law and their performances; the classical show trial of the dictatorship with all of its traditional staging mixed with the machismo of the Putinism. You really get a sense of how weak and few the voices of democracy are in the modern Russia.

Read more about the film here.

 

Martin Krasnik | Journalist